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Jump Rope For Heart and Hoops For Heart are national programs jointly sponsored by SHAPE America and the American Heart Association.


SHAPE America and AHA



 

Inclusive JRFH Adapted Program Ideas - Part II
 

 Jump Bands/Chinese Jump Rope
  • Jump/step in and out forward/backward, side/side, middle/straddle.
  • Do the above, but gradually raise the rope height.
  • Stand inside the jump bands/rope, straddle to make a diamond shape, jump and maintain shape.
  • Sit alongside jump bands/rope, hands jump in and out of middle.
Swinging Jump Rope
  • Jump/step over a stationary rope held at a suitable height by partners on both sides of the child.
  • Jump over a rope gently swung back and forth by partners.
  • Swing your own jump rope overhead, letting it hit your toes, then jump/step over it.
  • For students who can jump but can't hold a jump rope, jump with or without a stop; partners stand on both sides of the student, turn a long jump rope.
  • Partners stand on both sides of the student and turn a long jump rope overhead. A friend or parent holds the student's hand and helps him or her jump.
  • Partners slowly turn a long jump rope and the participant runs underneath as many times as possible without getting caught.
Additional Ideas for Wheelchair Users
  • Pulling self along the length of a rope that is secured horizontally. The level of the rope can vary from waist height to overhead.
  • With chair alongside climbing rope, reach above head and pull self up repeatedly.
  • Maneuver wheelchair in and out of cones set in a line or large circle.
  • Maneuver wheelchair to follow circle, a simple/difficult pattern on the floor made with rope, tape or cones.
Other ideas
  • To increase awareness of the rope, attach bells to the middle of the rope.
  • A friend or partner can clap or call "Jump!", to help signal when to jump.
  • Perform a designated locomotor skill in and out of cones set in a line or large circle.
  • Perform a designated locomotor skill to follow a simple/difficult pattern on the floor made with ropes, tape, or cones

Encourage students who don’t want to participate in rope activities to volunteer their time in other ways. They might serve drinks at the refreshment center, help out at the first-aid center, change the music CDs or tapes, serve as timekeepers or hand out awards. The possibilities for involving students in the event are endless.

 

Adapted from Kowalski, Ellen. (1996) Ideas for Change: Running an Inclusive Jump Rope For Heart Event. Presented at the annual conference of the New York Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance, Melville, NY.